A Pilot Study of Spirituality and Inpatient Rehabilitation Outcomes in Persons with Spinal Cord Dysfunction and Severe Neurological Illnesses

Katherine M. Piderman, Paul S. Mueller, Terry M. Theneau, Susanna R. Stevens, Andrew C. Hanson, Ronald K. Reeves

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This prospective, observational pilot study was conducted on an academic inpatient rehabilitation unit. Ninety-three persons with spinal cord dysfunction or severe neurological illness participated. All completed admission surveys; 46 completed surveys six months after discharge. The aims were to describe admission and post-discharge spirituality and associations between spirituality and rehabilitation outcomes. At admission, participants reported spirituality similar to that of other samples of medical patients. After discharge, frequency of private spiritual practices increased and spiritual and existential well-being decreased. No significant associations were detected between spirituality and rehabilitation outcomes. Findings suggest the importance of spirituality to the participants and future research with a larger sample and modifications to the methodology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalThe journal of pastoral care & counseling : JPCC
Volume65
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2011

Keywords

  • nervous system diseases
  • rehabilitation
  • spinal cord diseases
  • spinal cord injury
  • spirituality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Medicine

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